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Soya yogurt + Apricots for a beautiful dessert-Apricot small history

Publié le par Isabella-Vegan-♥

This recipe  transforms the mixture of apricots and SOYA yogurt into a beautiful dessert.

 

  1 cup apricot puree ( recipe on this blog )

1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon almond extract (optional)

2 cups SOYA yogurt

1 tablespoon finely chopped almonds, toasted or raw

 

1. Make the apricot purée as directed on the recipe

 If desired, add to it 1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon almond extract.

 

2. Spoon 1/4 cup thickened yogurt into the bottom of each of four tumblers or parfait glasses.

 

Top with 2 tablespoons of the apricot purée.

Make another 1/4 cup layer of yogurt on top of the apricot purée, and finish with another 2-tablespoon layer of apricot purée.

Cover tightly and chill for at least one hour. J

 ♥just before serving, sprinkle finely chopped almonds over the top.

 

Yield: Serves four.

Advance preparation: The assembled parfaits will hold in the refrigerator for a day.

 ***

The apricot (which means "early matured fruit" in Latin).

 was known in Armenia during ancient times, and has been cultivated there for so long it is often thought to be native there. Its scientific name Prunus armeniaca (Armenian plum) derives from that assumption.

 For example, De Poerderlé, writing in the 18th century, asserted "Cet arbre tire son nom de l'Arménie, province d'Asie, d'où il est originaire et d'où il fut porté en Europe ..." ("this tree takes its name from Armenia, province of Asia, where it is native, and whence it was brought to Europe ...").

 An archaeological excavation at Garni in Armenia found apricot seeds in an Eneolithic-era site.

 However, the Vavilov center of origin locates the origin of the apricot's domestication in the Chinese region, and other sources say the apricot was first cultivated in India in about 3000 BC.

Its introduction to Greece is attributed to Alexander the Great, and the Roman General Lucullus (106–57 B.C.) also exported some trees – the cherry, white heart cherry, and apricot – from Armenia to Europe.

Subsequent sources were often confused about the origin of the species. Loudon (1838) believed it had a wide native range including Armenia, Caucasus, the Himalaya, China, and Japan.

Today the cultivars have spread to all parts of the globe with climates that support it.

Apricots have been cultivated in Persia since antiquity, and dried ones were an important commodity on Persian trade routes. Apricots remain an important fruit in modern-day Iran where they are known under the common name of Zard-ālū (Persian: زردآلو).

Egyptians usually dry apricots, add sweetener, and then use them to make a drink called "'amar al-dīn."

xxx

The apricot trees grow up to 15 feet tall, and they'll actually produce fruit for an average of 25 years! That's a lot of apricots...

The main powerhouse nutrients and vitamins in apricots are vitamin A, vitamin C, potassium, iron, phosphorus, calcium, and perhaps best of all (and a great asset to colon health), fiber. Not to mention they're one of the healthier fruits you can eat calorie and fat wise.

Keep in mind; we're talking about fresh apricots in the above information. Most people associate apricots with the dried version, and while those are still great and contain a lot of fiber, they're also high in calories due to the sugar content, and they may contain a preservative that has the possibility of instigating asthma attacks.

* Never-the-less, dried apricots are still a great snack alternative to candies and cakes, and they still contain** good amounts of iron and potassium.

Perhaps one of the most revered assets of eating apricots is the extremely high level of beta-carotene, which is a card carrying member of the anti-oxidant family.

 Anti-oxidants, among other benefits, are best known for its role in disease fighting and prevention. Just one apricot contains roughly 30% of the recommended US daily intake amount of beta-carotene.

When ingested, beta-carotene converts to vitamin A, which is a key vitamin that keeps your gums, hair, and skin healthy (not to mention a host of other glands and organs).

*Vitamin A helps in fighting disease due to it's immune system boosting power, and much research has been done on apricots to harness the vast amounts of beta-carotene (vitamin A), so that it can be used for healing.

Not only does an apricot contain a healthy amount of fiber, which is key for good colon health (helps to clean out the "gunk" that builds up over time), it's also on the starting lineup for fighting heart disease. Apricots contain a couple other powerful substances which you may know as Vitamin C, and also Lycopene. When you combine the above two, the resulting compound is an excellent way to protect yourself from heart disease, stroke, and even many forms of cancer.

*The apricot (*which means "early matured fruit" in Latin), was discovered in China

The apricot trees grow up to 15 feet tall, and they'll actually produce fruit for an average of 25 years! That's a lot of apricots...

The main powerhouse nutrients and vitamins in apricots are vitamin A, vitamin C, potassium, iron, phosphorus, calcium, and perhaps best of all (and a great asset to colon health), fiber.

Not to mention they're one of the healthier fruits you can eat calorie and fat wise.

Keep in mind; we're talking about fresh apricots in the above information. Most people associate apricots with the dried version, and while those are still great and contain a lot of fiber, they're also **high in calories due to the sugar content, and they *may contain a preservative .

Never-the-less, dried apricots are still a great snack alternative to candies and cakes, and they still contain*** good amounts of iron and potassium.

Perhaps one of the most revered assets of eating apricots is the extremely high level of beta-carotene, which is a card carrying member of the anti-oxidant family.

 Anti-oxidants, among other benefits, are best known for its role in disease fighting and prevention.

***Just one apricot contains roughly 30% of the recommended US daily intake amount of beta-carotene. So get to eating!

When ingested, beta-carotene converts to vitamin A, which is a key vitamin that keeps your gums, hair, and skin healthy (not to mention a host of other glands and organs).

Vitamin A helps in fighting disease due to it's immune system boosting power, and much research has been done on apricots to harness the vast amounts of beta-carotene (vitamin A), so that it can be used for healing.

 

Not only does an apricot contain a healthy amount of fiber, which is key for good colon health (helps to clean out the "gunk" that builds up over time),

it's also on the starting lineup for fighting heart disease.

* Apricots contain a couple other powerful substances which you may know as Vitamin C, and also Lycopene.

 

***When you combine the above two, the resulting compound is an excellent way to protect yourself from heart disease, stroke, and even many forms of cancer.

 

♥♥♥

 

Publié dans RECIPES ♥

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